Image source, Bournemouth goats

Image caption, The herd lives on a seven-mile stretch of cliffs near Bournemouth

Rangers monitoring a herd of goats on the cliffs are urging people to contact them rather than emergency services if they spot any problems.

The herd of 50 goats graze on the steep cliffs between West Cliff and Southbourne in Bournemouth.

The call came after firefighters were called to the cliffs on Monday after a goat got its head stuck in a fence.

The kid goat King was freed by the goat vulture and now has a dowel between his horns so he can’t get stuck again.

Image source, Bournemouth goats

Image caption, Goat calf King, stuck after he stuck his little head through the fence to explore the grass on the other side

After a call came in about the trapped goat on Monday afternoon, Dorset & Wiltshire Fire and Rescue Service sent a team of firefighters to the scene, but the fire service said they were unable to reach the goat safely.

At 16:00 BST the decision was made to mobilise the technical rescue team from Poole, “as we were unsure how long it would take for the owner to arrive on site… however the owner arrived ahead of the crew and resolved the situation himself.”

Image source, Bournemouth goats

Image caption, King has a device fitted to his horns to prevent him from sticking his head through the fence

BCP ranger Tom Bennet said: “It is important that people call the BCP council and report any problems with the goats, rather than the emergency services.

“If a young animal sticks its head through the water, it must be released. Just call the council, they alert the rural team and we will take action.”

He added that King was fine after sticking his head through the fence.

After a device was attached to his horns, he said, “He’s grazing happily and he can’t get his head through the fence anymore.”

Image source, Bournemouth goats

Image caption, The goats have become something of a tourist attraction and even have their own social media accounts

Since their introduction in 2009, the goats have become a real tourist attraction and even have their own social media accounts.

According to Mark Jackson, their cattle farmer, it usually takes a few minutes for problems to arise because there are constant passers-by.

They live year-round on a seven-mile stretch of cliffs to graze off invasive plants on the steep, inaccessible cliffs.

Before the herd was released to eat the vegetation, the BCP Council had to pay the costs of deploying specialist teams to clear the cliffs.

The goats are part of an environmental management agreement between the council and Natural England.

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